Category Archives: ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice

What does it mean to be a “good” student according to the common sense? Which students are privileged by this definition of the good student? Which are oppressed and left out?

Teachers often say they want their students to be “good” students, but what exactly does that mean? Well, for some it means students who are actively engaged, puts effort into the assignments and ask appropriate questions at appropriate times. To … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | Leave a comment

Kumashiro describes three kinds of programs that produce teachers. Which image best describes your own experience of learning to be a teacher in this program?

In chapter 1, Kumashiro describes three kinds of programs that produce teachers: teacher as learned practitioner, teacher as researcher and teacher as professional. The option I feel best describes my program is teacher as learned practitioner, although clearly other elements … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | Leave a comment

Assignment #2 Part 1

Summaries: 1. ‘Teaching in the Undertow: Resisting the Pull of Schooling-as-usual’ by Gregory Michie p. 43 ~This article is based on an extended metaphor comparing new teaching and its difficulties to being caught in the undertow of the ocean. The … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | 1 Comment

From the readings and conversations in class how do you see yourself teaching treaties, and for what reasons?

The article “Teaching Treaties as (Un)Usual Narratives: Disrupting the Curricular Commonsense” by Jennifer Tupper and Michael Cappello discusses the teaching of treaties in Canada. I want to teach about treaties not because it is mandated, but because it is a … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | 2 Comments

As you complete this week’s readings, make note of the various ways that the idea of race is used in the text. What does race mean in this textbook? What does it meant that teachers are being taught to think in racial terms? What are the effects of teaching teachers to think in this way?

In “A History of Education” by Painter, the term race is used several times. This text first uses the term “race” to generally refer to human kind (p. 5), and again in the same meaning on p. 8. Already there … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | Leave a comment

Where do you see common sense at work in the definitions? Especially in the first link, list some of the ways that common sense might be connected to how we can define curriculum.

Anti-oppressive education creates discussions that education can create or contribute to the oppression of a person in a social group based on race, class, gender, ability, sexual orientation, etc.. Many of our “common sense” ideas or rituals harm these people, … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | Leave a comment

Why is it so important to pay attention to the “commonsense”? Ideas, thoughts, and quotations from the reading.

Common sense is a dangerous thing. Simply living everyday life and participating in society’s “common sense” is dangerous. This kind of living does not force ourselves to challenge what common sense means to us as individuals, certain social groups, or … Continue reading

Posted in ECS 210: Curriculum as Cultural and Social Practice | 1 Comment